physical security

DefCon 19, Day 3

Sunday was interesting — this was actually the first DefCon I have attended (and I’ve been to the last five) where Sunday was actually busy. Normally Sunday feels very empty — most people have gone home, and the ones that are still around are too hung over to go to the morning sessions. I was […]

attacks, hardware, networks, physical security, products

DefCon 19, Day 1

Having finished with BlackHat, I checked out of the Flamingo and moved to DefCon’s new location this year, the Rio. This was an enormous upgrade from the Riviera, the previous location. For one, the conference center is nearly 50% bigger, and it’s beautiful. Traffic flow was greatly improved, despite record attendance (~12,000, from estimates I’ve […]

industry, physical security, privacy, risk, society, statistics, terrorism

DefCon 16, Day 1

Having finished up with the BlackHat briefings, it was time to go on to DefCon.  While many of the speakers from BlackHat stay on for DefCon, there’s also a lot of DefCon-only presentations, usually with a more attack-oriented focus (in keeping with DefCon’s nature as a hacker convention rather than a security conference like BlackHat.) […]

anonymity, attacks, crypto, networks, physical security

Whole-Disk Encryption Cracked

Early this week, some researchers at Princeton University’s Center for Information Technology Policy released a fascinating video of whole-disk encryption being cracked quite quickly and easily. Whole-disk encryption products — such as PGP Whole Disk Encryption, TrueCrypt System Encryption, and Windows Vista’s BitLocker — work by encrypting the entire hard disk with a symmetric key, […]

attacks, crypto, hardware, mitigations, physical security, products

Semi-Electronic Bank Robbery

The AP has a story about an electronic bank robbery foiled when a bank employee pulled the plug on the robbers’ network connection.  Apparently the robbers had gained physical access to the employee’s workstation at some point, and installed “advanced technical equipment” underneath the desk to remotely control the computer. I would guess that the […]

attacks, networks, physical security